© 2023 by "This Just In". Proudly created with Wix.com

Fondazione Prada Milan

 

 

If you ever travel to Milan (which is a rather popular destination), don‘t limit yourselves with just Duomo, La Scala, The Last Supper or designer boutiques. Take a metro M3 line to Lodi T.I.B.B. stop, have a fifteen minutes walk through Milano Chinese block and when you‘ll think that you have probably got lost, as you see dreadful railroad tracks on the right and industrial sites on the left, you actually bump into Fondazione Prada.

 

Opened just in May, 2015, the new Milan venue of Fondazione Prada presents all types of modern art from different pieces of architecture and space to modern installations. You don‘t have to like the exhibition, as, for instance, a permanent installation conceived by Robert Gober (1954) and two works by Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010) put on display in the Haunted House. Anyway you start seeing and thinking differently. Or frown with disdain, having in mind the same cynical phrase as perhaps many others have but try to conceal: „This is no art. Just total crap.“ But still you‘re not left emotionless and likely this is what the modern art is about.

 

The venue itself is a piece of art built in place of a former distillery complex dating back to the 1910s. There is a movie theatre there where you can watch a series of short films showing how the reconstructions have been carried out. This demonstration is also a piece of a modern cinematic art.

The whole place is so elegant and corresponds to the very image of Milan as a capital of fashion, though the surroundings and the very place brought up to life aren‘t even close to artistic elegancy. It is like a sophisticated island in the urban wasteland.

 

The other place you‘d definetly enjoy there is Bar Luce designed by film director Wes Anderson. Cozy interior and outdoor terrace is a perfect final stop after your visit to Fondazione Prada goes to the end. „I tried to make it a bar I would want to spend my own non-fictional afternoons in“, says Wes Anderson. Probably there is no better desription of the bar‘s atmosphere.